Home Inspection

 

Home Inspection

Home inspections provide a level of objectivity in evaluating a home. It is recommended that any home, even a new home, be inspected. Home inspectors play the role of the objective third party. Typically, home inspectors evaluate a property five to ten days before contract negotiations are complete in order to secure mortgage approval. A typical Dallas home inspection will cost about $250 to $350 and take a few hours, prices fluctuate slightly for surrounding areas. Inspection allows buyers and sellers to resolve problems prior to closing. Even though Texas has no home inspection requirements, it is still recommended that you have one performed. For a seller, a home inspection as part of pre-listing a home can help sell the home in a timelier manner. For a buyer, it helps cut down the emotional appeal of a property and gives a more objective and realistic evaluation.

Important things to remember:

  • Initial inspections only check the condition of the home at the time of inspection and do not guarantee any condition beyond that point.
  • Some special features on a home may not be included in the inspection such as swimming pools, in-ground sprinklers, gazebos, etc.
  • It is important that buyers of a home go on the inspection with the inspector and observe.
  • Inspectors will not necessarily catch every possible problem in a home.
  • Even new homes need to be inspected. All homes are not exactly up to the standards of the model you tour.
  • Inspectors should not recommend or bid on repair work; this is a conflict of interest.


A good inspector will:

  • Check for radon and other harmful gases.
  • Describe what they are checking.
  • Show you useful information such as where to shut off water or light a furnace.
  • Give you a report in writing.


Home inspection is now a regulated industry, so make sure you hire a licensed inspector.
Questions to ask of an inspection company:

  • How long has the company been performing inspections?
  • Does the company have Error and Omissions insurance?
  • Will the company give a written and signed report?
  • Does the company stand behind its report (give a guarantee)?
  • How many real estate companies does the company give service too?

 

For further information please contact us.

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Because every home is unique, the cost for a home inspection can vary. Every home is unique. Because each home is different, the cost of a home inspection for each home also varies. Factor in that every home inspector determines his or her own rates, and it can feel like a guessing game for a home buyer to know which home inspector to hire. A home inspection on an average home will typically cost between $300 and $450 depending on a variety of factors.

5 biggest home inspection mistakes

By Alyson McNutt English • Bankrate.com

 

A home inspection is one of the most important steps you can take to make sure your new home is a sound investment and a safe place to live.

But, many people don't fully understand what happens in a home inspection or what they need to do to get the most out of it. Find out what inspectors say are the five biggest mistakes buyers make during the home inspection, and how you can avoid these potentially pricey pitfalls.

Mistake No. 1: Not having new construction inspected

Even experienced homebuyers sometimes make this rookie mistake. They assume that because a home has passed all local codes and ordinances, it must be in good shape. Don't be so sure, says Jim Troth, owner of Habitation Investigation LLC, a Mechanicsburg, Ohio, home inspection company. Troth once inspected a brand new home that had just passed the final municipal and county building inspections. But when he explored the crawl space beneath the house, he discovered someone had removed about 3 feet of the home's main support beam to accommodate duct work.

"The house was already beginning to sink in that area," he says.

The moral of the story: Don't assume your builder -- or the contractors -- did everything right just because the home passed code. An inspector is your last line of defense against major defects that could quite literally sink your financial future.

Mistake No. 2: Choosing an inspector for the wrong reasons

When you choose an inspector, you're selecting the professional who will give one of your biggest investments a full physical checkup. You want to choose someone you know who is competent, thorough and trustworthy. Unfortunately, too many buyers just go with the cheapest inspection company or the one recommended by their Realtor.

"The least expensive person is often the person with the least experience, ability and technical savvy," says Aaron Flook, owner of Pittsburgh-based A.M. Inspection Services LLC. "If you want a referral from your real estate agent, ask for two or three different names, then interview each one to determine who you feel most comfortable with."

Always ask about licensing, professional affiliations and credentials, and whether the inspector carries errors and omissions insurance.

Mistake No. 3: Not going along on the inspection

The written report you get from the inspector doesn't give you nearly as clear a picture of the condition of the house as you might think. Flook says buyers who don't go along on the inspection can overemphasize minor problems, or worse, not realize how serious a defect is.

"I did one inspection where the buyer didn't come along, and he ended up getting worked up about first-floor plugs that weren't grounded and completely ignored that the water tank was drafting carbon monoxide," Flook says. "You really need to go along with the inspector, ask questions and listen when he gives you his professional opinion on the house."

Mistake No. 4: Not following up on the inspector's recommendations

Sometimes, buyers don't follow up on items discovered in the inspection before they close. Like the man who didn't grasp that the carbon monoxide coming from his water heaterwas a big problem, you may not realize how much it will cost to fix a given defect. Often inspectors will recommend buyers get an issue evaluated further, but the buyers wait to do it until after closing, says Kathleen Kuhn, president of the inspection company HouseMaster of Bound Brook, N.J.

"If buyers wait to have a system evaluated until after closing, it can turn out to be more expensive or a bigger deal than what they anticipated," Kuhn says.

Kuhn says you should always get several estimates on repairs before closing, and you should feel comfortable calling your inspector to discuss these estimates. "The inspector may be able to share some insight into the contractors' suggestions," she says.

Mistake No. 5: Expecting your home inspector to be a psychic

No matter how experienced or skilled your home inspector is, he can't see the future. "Home inspectors don't have crystal balls, so they can't specifically predict when an aging system will fail," Kuhn says. "Sometimes, optimistic homebuyers think a system still has a few good years just because there aren't visible signs of malfunction at the time of inspection."

A home inspector can tell you that an air conditioning system like the one in the home you're buying usually only lasts 10 years, and yours is 11 years old. But he can't tell you when it will fail. That's when you need to follow up with people who know more about each specific system about which you have questions.

And remember, the home inspector is hired by you. He's there to give you an honest, straight opinion about the house.

"The inspector is one of the few people in the buying process whose income doesn't depend on the home closing," Troth says. "They're paid to inspect, not to sell. So they're in a better position to be neutral."

Need an inspector?

  • Check out www.MyTrustedVendors.com

Legal disclaimer

The material provided here is for informational purposes only and is not intended and should not be considered as legal advice for your particular matter. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Applicability of the legal principles discussed in this material may differ substantially in individual situations.

While The Yeatman Team of Ebby Halliday Realtors has used reasonable efforts in collecting and preparing materials included here, due to the rapidly changing nature of the real estate marketplace and the law, and our reliance on information provided by outside sources,  The Yeatman Team of Ebby Halliday Realtors makes no representation, warranty, or guarantee of the accuracy or reliability of any information provided here or elsewhere on texasrealestate.com.

Any legal or other information found here, on TheYeatmanTeam.com, or at other sites to which we link, should be verified before it is relied upon.

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